Best Tablets With Stylus For Note Taking

Last Updated on December 28, 2022 by Ernests Embutnieks

Arguably tablets with stylus support are better than paper and pen. There are just some certain features that make them irresistible.

It’s futuristic. You can organize your notes easily, you can search in your notes, and you can never lose your notes again. Your dog can eat them. You can’t spill coffee over them. Your notes will always be in the cloud.

Note-taking on tablets has become quite popular, and I believe the popularity will just rise because it’s more convenient than taking notes on paper with a pencil.

In this article, I want to go through the best tablets with stylus support for note-taking.

Best Tablets With Stylus For Note Taking

There are a few reasons why one tablet may be classified as great for note-taking while the other with similar specifications may not be considered very worthwhile. They are:

The Stylus

A warrior can only fight with the power of his sword. The same applies here to your stylus. A stylus can dictate how you view a tablet in terms of note-taking and can completely redefine your experience. Its ergonomics, ease of access, and eventual storage are important factors that we’ve taken into accord when deciding our rankings.

Battery Life

Imagine not being able to take important notes in a class because your battery ran out. While most tablets in this list cross the 6-7 hour mark, we’ve given special points to tablets that go even further. In essence, these tablets provide the comfort needed to a student or someone in a professional setting so that they’ll be able to survive a day without flocking to a charger.

Display

The quality of the display, whether it’s laminated or not, its refresh rate, the overall feel of the glass, etc., can truly change your note-taking experience. Small factors like these can make note-taking feel extremely fluid or very dreary and disconnected.

App Ecosystem

You really don’t want to be stuck transferring notes from one application to the other all day long. That’s why we’ve given special points to tablets that support great cross-platform applications that let you seamlessly move from one device to the other without needing to carry out drawn-out lengthy export processes.

Of course, kudos to applications that also support features such as converting handwriting to text, annotations, marking, OCR, and more.

Best Overall
iPad Pro

iPad Pro

  • OS: iPadOS
  • Processor: Apple M2
  • Storage: 128 GB / 256 GB / 512 GB / 1 TB / 2 TB
  • RAM: 8 GB / 16 GB
  • Camera: 12 MP (Wide) + 10 MP (Ultrawide) / 12 MP (Ultrawide)
  • Display Size: 11 / 12.9 inches
  • Resolution: 2048×2732 (~265 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
  • Weight: 1.50 lbs
  • Port: USB-C
  • Battery: 9-10 hours
  • Stylus Included?: No 

The iPad Pro remains the best tablet for note taking as of yet. Packed with a ton of exciting features, I use this tablet for my own note taking due to a few reasons. Firstly, it features an excellent 120 Hz ProMotion display with a high response rate that makes the Apple Pencil glide on the screen.

 Moreover, the newer iPad Pro comes equipped with Apple Pencil Hover, a feature that lets you identify where exactly your stylus is landing even before it gets there. Moreover, the Apple Pencil 2 just works great with the iPad Pro. Featuring a dedicated magnetic strip on the side for charging and storage, the Pencil 2 just seamlessly connects to the iPad.

 The impressive plethora of applications, such as Procreate, doesn’t cease to amaze either. Apple’s ecosystem truly shines here, and its quite obvious that the Pro goes leagues beyond what other tablets (even ones from Apple) are presenting when it comes to note taking.

 Might I add, the iPad Pro has a desktop-grade Apple Silicon M2 chip that doesn’t really even sweat it when you take notes. But, the excellent display and cameras help ensure that you’ll be able to use the tablet for other tasks such as video editing, photo editing, playing games, and performing resource-intensive tasks with relative ease. 

 Plus, the impressive M2 chip with its 10-hour battery life doesn’t really hurt. You’ll be able to take notes for hours on end with your hand fatiguing before the iPad runs out. All in all, the best choice for note taking this year.

 

Pros
  • Absolutely gorgeous display(vibrant colors)
  • Apple Pencil Hover is a welcome addition for artists
  • Exceptional processing speed (M2 Chip)
  • Great battery life
  • Exclusive apps (such as Goodnotes 5 & Notability)
Cons
  • Extremely expensive(especially with Magic Keyboard & Apple Pencil)
  • Doesn’t bring a whole lot new to the table compared to the previous gen iPad Pro
  • 12.9-inch model is quite heavy
Best Android Tablet For Note-Taking
Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Plus

Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Plus

  • OS: Android 13
  • Processor: Snapdragon 8 Gen 1
  • Storage: 128 GB / 256 GB / 512 GB
  • RAM: 8 GB / 12 GB / 16 GB
  • Camera: 13 MP (Wide) + 6 MP (Ultrawide) / 12 MP (Ultrawide)
  • Display Size: 12.4 inches
  • Resolution: 1752×2800 (~266 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
  • Weight: 1.25 lbs
  • Port: USB-C
  • Battery: 8-9 hours
  • Stylus Included?: Yes

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 / Plus / Ultra area ll a great tablet for digital note-taking. Each of them shares the same infrastructure, with the only bifurcator being their screen size. I love the fact that Samsung included S Pen in the price. I find it comfortable to use and quite ergonomic, and the weight gives it a premium feel.

 However, from what I’ve seen online and some of my slight personal experience, the nib does tend to wear off a bit quicker than the Apple Pencil. This is dependent on what type of screen protector you have on your tablet. But, for most, I suggest keeping a few replacements in handy just in case.

 The oval-shaped button located on the side of the pen allows you to interact with the tablet even further by opening up notes, taking screen grabs, or accessing the quick access panel in the bottom right corner of the screen.

 The palm rejection on the tablet is excellent, it has great pressure sensitivity, and coupled with the Snapdragon 8 Gen 1, it definitely isn’t a slouch by any stretch of the imagination. So, if you are looking for a proper iPad Pro contender in the world of tablets with its own 120 Hz, Super AMOLED, HDR 10+ display then the Tab S8 lineup is an amazing choice for note-taking.

Pros
  • S Pen included
  • Powerful processor
  • Decent battery life
  • Big screen, beautiful colors
  • Dex mode
Cons
  • Keyboard case not included
  • No charger in the box
  • Some might believe the screen is too big for a tablet
  • Nib wears out quite quickly
Best Value For Price
iPad Air (2022 Model)

iPad Air (2022 Model)

  • OS: iPadOS
  • Processor: Apple M1
  • Storage: 64 GB / 256 GB
  • RAM: 8 GB RAM
  • Camera: 12 MP (Wide) / 12 MP (Ultrawide)
  • Display Size: 10.9 inches
  • Resolution: 1640×2360 (~264 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: 60 Hz
  • Weight: 1.02 lbs
  • Port: USB-C
  • Battery: 9-10 hours
  • Stylus Included?: No 

The iPad Air is a note-taking tablet from Apple that’s meant for the most budget-conscious among you. It still definitely isn’t cheap. But it is a long shot from the iPad Pro. Surprisingly though, you don’t sacrifice on much if you opt for the iPad Air compared to the iPad Pro.

 For instance, you gain access to the Apple Pencil Gen 2, which has the same response rate but with a reduced refresh rate of only 60 Hz. Moreover, you also get the magnetic side charger but with no Apple Pencil Hover this time.
 
Performance remains identical since you’ll be dumbfounded in trying to find a difference in the M1 and M2 when it comes to just taking note. Personally speaking, I find the 10.9 inch form factor quite convenient as it’s easier to carry around compared to the 12.9 inch iPad Pro.

 You gain access to the same ecosystem of applications, the same battery life (if not slightly better), and an astonishingly long time of software support. Moreover, third-party accessories such as Apple Pencil grip covers from Paperlike and screen protectors really elevate your experience. 

 

Pros
  • M1 processor
  • Good battery life
  • Good cameras (front & back)
  • Suitable for almost any purpose
  • Compatible with Apple Pencil & Magic Keyboard
Cons
  • No face-ID
  • No headphone jack
  • Limited storage
Budget iPad
iPad 10th Gen

iPad 10th Gen

  • OS: iPadOS
  • Processor: Apple A14 Bionic
  • Storage: 64 GB / 256 GB
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • Camera: 12 MP (Wide) / 12 MP (Ultrawide)
  • Display Size: 10.9 inches
  • Resolution: 1640×2360 (~264 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: 60 Hz
  • Weight: 1.02 lbs
  • Port: USB-C
  • Battery: 9-10 hours
  • Stylus Included?: No 

If budget is what truly matters, the iPad 10th Gen is truly king. Coming in cheaper than the iPad Air and the iPad Pro, the iPad 10th Gen is equipped with all the essentials for avid note-taking. However, in true Apple fashion, there are a few drawbacks you’ll have to get used to.

 Firstly, and perhaps most importantly, the iPad 10th Gen comes compatible only with the first Generation Apple Pencil. This means that there’s no magnetic compartment for storage and charging as the Pencil is charged with wire.

 Now, here comes an important question, the iPad 10th Gen is equipped with USB-C, but the Apple Pencil comes with a Lightning Jack; how do I charge it? Well…dongles. While it was quite annoying with the initial iPad Pro Series to have a protruding Pencil when it charges, the 10th Gen goes a step further with you requiring a USB-C to Lightning Jack dongle to charge the Pencil with no compartment to house it.

 If you are okay with this, then there’s no other major difference. The Apple Pencil 1 is slightly worse for artists as it doesn’t respond to pressure as well. But, to be fair, we’ve not really seen this issue to be very grounded, as even Apple hasn’t commented on the performance difference between the two styluses. 

 The iPad 10th Gen comes equipped with an A14 Bionic. Granted, it isn’t going to setting Geekbench records, it certainly isn’t a slouch by any stretch of the imagination either. So, if you are into casual video editing, photo editing, and gaming, you should be good to go.

 With a stellar battery life, and a decent 60 Hz display while also packing in all the essentials, the iPad 10th Gen is one of the best budget tablets for note-taking made.

 

Pros
  • Good price
  • Good cameras
  • Sharp display(bigger on this model)
  • USB-C port
Cons
  • Compatible with Apple Pencil 1. needs adapter to charge it
  • No face-ID
  • Non-laminated display(other iPads have laminated)
  • No headphone jack
Best Windows Note-Taking Tablet
Microsoft Surface Pro 9

Microsoft Surface Pro 9

  • OS: Windows 11 Home
  • Processor: Intel Core i5 / i7 / SQ3(5g)
  • Storage: 128 GB / 256 GB / 512 GB / 1 TB
  • RAM: 8 GB / 16 GB / 32 GB LPDDR5
  • Camera: 10 MP Front Facing
  • Display Size: 13 inches
  • Resolution: 2880×1920 (~267 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
  • Weight: 1.94 lbs
  • Port: USB-C
  • Battery: Up to 19hours (5g model)
  • Stylus Included?: No 

The Microsoft Surface Pro 9 is a laptop that also doubles down as a tablet when it comes down to it. Equipped with the Surface Slim Pen 2, the Surface Pro 9 delivers an excellent experience when it comes to taking notes.

 The only aspect it is limited by Windows OS. Don’t get us wrong; there are some excellent applications you can use to take notes on the tablet. But, Apple has been in the game for a fair amount of time now. Overall, Apple has created better apps and a better experiences overall, when it comes to taking notes with the Stylus type of device on your tablet. 

 For instance, you can use the Apple Pencil to quickly take notes at any time using the iPad. While Windows alternatives do exist, they lack the finesse and polish that a closely-knit operating system provides. Besides that, we have little to no complaints. The stylus feels like an actual pencil, has a reasonably tactile nib, and the stylus feels great to hold, especially if you’re more used to pens rather than pencils.

 The tablet itself is fantastic. It has an excellent display, runs full Windows, and has a sleek design coupled with the Signature Keyboard that really lets you get in on some of that productivity action. (You have to buy the keyboard separately, but it really can turn your tablet into a laptop) The reason why I really like this tablet for note-taking is that in some classroom situations where you need a laptop, the Surface can act as one.

 And, on other places where you just want to take notes, you can let go of all the Windows jargon and just focus on one application to be able to seamlessly take your notes. Talk about double duty!

 

Pros
  • Powerful processor
  • Big screen
  • Can be used as a laptop and tablet
  • Great battery life
Cons
  • Keyboard not included in price
  • Limited apps
  • With top specifications – it’s quite expensive
Lenovo Tab P12 Pro

Lenovo Tab P12 Pro

  • OS: Android 11
  • Processor: Snapdragon 870 5G
  • Storage: 128 GB / 256 GB
  • RAM: 6 GB / 8 GB RAM
  • Camera: 13 MP (Wide) + 5 MP (Ultrawide) / 8 MP (Wide)
  • Display Size: 12.6 inches
  • Resolution: 1600×2560 (~240 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
  • Weight: 1.02 lbs
  • Port: USB-C
  • Battery: 8-9 hours
  • Stylus Included?: Yes

The Lenovo Tab P12 Pro was released alongside the Precision Pen 3. Both are meant to complement each other, with the Pen allowing the tablet to take notes. Now, I’m a huge fan of the tablet itself.

 
It features a sleek, gorgeous design alongside a fantastic 12.6 inch 2K AMOLED display equipped with a Snapdragon 870. The tablet is fairly quick, has an 8-9 hour battery life, and checks all the boxes especially given its relatively reasonable price.

 But, for note-taking. I have some issues. First of all, the screen is highly sensitive. In essence, palm rejection doesn’t really work all that well here, and you’ll see random squiggles in your sheet more often than not. Plus, the stylus just feels cheap to hold and tires you out if you hold it for longer periods of time.

 In my opinion, the stylus made more sense when browsing and clicking or taking quick notes rather than for serious note-takers.(Maybe Samsung and Apple has spoiled me) This is because the stylus’s interface itself needs improvement. It feels bogged down by the plethora of features that the tablet tries to throw on you and feels glitchy sometimes.

 But, if you are someone who can let go of all the third-party nuances and features, then the nib and overall stylus just feels alright. Compared to others in the list, it does feel a bit plasticky. However, it is hard to complain at this price point.

 I found this a bit disappointing simply because the Lenovo Tab P12 Pro is an excellent tablet. And, if it wasn’t for the sub-par stylus, I would’ve easily classified it at the top of the list. 

Pros
  • Sleep design
  • 2k display
  • MicroSD slot
  • Good battery
  • Reasonably priced
Cons
  • Accessories not included
  • Average camera
  • 5G only available for selected markets
  • Stylus isn’t that great
Samsung Budget Tablet For Note-Taking
Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 Lite (2022)

Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 Lite (2022)

  • OS: Android 12
  • Processor: Snapdragon 720G
  • Storage: 64 GB / 128 GB
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • Camera: 8 MP (Wide) / 5 MP (Wide)
  • Display Size: 10.4 inches
  • Resolution: 1200×2000 (~224 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: 60 Hz
  • Weight: 1.03 lbs
  • Port: USB-C
  • Battery: 7-8 hours
  • Stylus Included?: Yes 

The Tab S6 Lite is Samsung’s budget entry tablet that features a premium metal chassis and Samsung’s S Pen, which magnetically latches onto the side when not in use. It comes right in the box and doesn’t need to be charged.

 This means that while the stylus lacks some of the wireless features that the Tab S6 has, it’ll never let you down when you are in a pinch. The tablet features a suite of applications for note-taking, which you can access by holding the stylus’s singular button.

 One great feature for note-taking I found when using the tablet was the ability to change the transparency of the note-taking window and to be able to use it even when a video is being played on the screen. This allows students and professionals alike to jot down notes while also being able to view videos, perfect for exam revision sessions.

 Even at this price point, we are met with a fully laminated display which means that there’s no actual gap between the S Pen and the display. All in all, the S6 Lite is a great tablet for note-taking simply because it comes with the stylus right out of the box, requires no additional setup, connects seamlessly, and also works great.

 

Pros
  • Great price
  • Keyboard & Stylus support
  • Expandable storage (up to 1TB)
  • Face-ID
  • Samsung DeX
Cons
  • No fingerprint sensor
  • Average performance
  • Keyboard can be sluggish
Best 8-inch Tablet For Notes
iPad Mini 6

iPad Mini 6

  • OS: iPadOS
  • Processor: Apple A15 Bionic
  • Storage: 64 GB / 256 GB
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • Camera: 12 MP (Wide) / 12 MP (Ultrawide)
  • Display Size: 8.3 inches
  • Resolution: 1488×2266 (~327 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: 60 Hz
  • Weight: 1.32 lbs
  • Port: USB-C
  • Battery: 9-10 hours
  • Stylus Included?: No 

The iPad Mini 6 is the smallest tablet in this list when it comes to note taking capabilities. But don’t be fooled by its size. What it loses in size, it certainly makes up for in utility and portability. Coming in at a measly 8.3 inches, the iPad Mini 6 is any note-taker’s dream.

 Featuring the Apple Pencil 2, coupled with a magnetic charger on the side and all the Pencil 2’s bells and whistles except Apple Pencil Hover, the iPad Mini 6’s A15 Bionic complements the whole package quite elegantly. 

 For note-taking, the Mini 6 felt right at home with the rest of the iPad lineup, with the only caveat being the fact that it does not support Apple’s Magic Keyboard, but there are some alternatives. In essence, you’ll either have to connect a Bluetooth keyboard or use your fingers to do all your typing.
 
If that doesn’t seem to be a problem, then the iPad Mini 6 will feel right at home. While the small size may feel appealing to some note-takers, I find out to be a great form factor, especially for students who find the portability of the essence. 

Overall, the iPad Mini 6 is one of my favorite tablets. It’s a great option in many categories – games, reading, chilling, etc. I personally like to experience it while taking notes on it, but I feel that the display is a bit too small for this purpose. You can definitely do it, but it’s just way more comfortable if you have a 10.9-inch screen. If you have bigger hands, even more so. I would recommend a bigger screen. Besides the size, it’s the perfect power tablet that you can fit in your pocket. 

 

Pros
  • Supports Apple Pencil 2
  • Portable & compact
  • Good mic & speakers
  • Good camera
  • USB-C
  • LCD display
  • Perfect for reading (e-books)
Cons
  • No Magic Keyboard
  • No headphone jack
  • Hard to take notes if you have big hands
  • The screen feels a bit too small for schoolwork
Chrome OS
Lenovo Chromebook Duet 3

Lenovo Chromebook Duet 3

  • OS: ChromeOS
  • Processor: Snapdragon 7c Gen 2
  • Storage: 64 GB / 128 GB
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • Camera: 12 MP (Wide) / 12 MP (Ultrawide)
  • Display Size: 10.9 inches
  • Resolution: 2000×1200 (~213 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: 60 Hz
  • Weight: 1.14 lbs
  • Port: USB-C
  • Battery: Up to 12 hours
  • Stylus Included?: No 

The Chromebook Duet 3 is an interesting choice for taking notes. This is because, as of yet, it doesn’t really have a proprietary stylus. Instead, it supports USI 1.0 and USI 2.0 standards which means that there are a few styluses that you can use with the Duet 3 to take notes.

 Now, the Lenovo USI 2.0 Pen is already out in some markets. But, you’ll probably be finding an HP or a Lenovo USI 1.0 Pen with your local retailer. Both of these styluses are fine. They feel quite cheap, and they don’t live up to the same standards as some of the other styluses we’ve mentioned in the list.

 While a more open standard is great, it also leads to less customization and proprietary features. Chromebooks are not that great for taking notes in comparison to some of the premium tablets on the list. The entire experience can feel slow, and a lot of times, you won’t be able to get the same level of quality out of your notes as compared to a mobile-based platform such as Android.

 While Windows does suffer from the same fate, it is to a lesser degree compared to Chromebooks. It’s clear that this is an evolving platform. However, if basic note taking is more your thing and you just want a working solution on a Chromebook, the Lenovo Chromebook Duet 3 definitely isn’t a bad choice.

Pros
  • Great price
  • Good battery life
  • USB-C port x2
  • Keyboard included in price
Cons
  • The Stylus could be better
  • Overall note-taking experience is average in comparison
  • No headphone jack
ReMarkable 2

ReMarkable 2

  • OS: Codex
  • Processor: 1.2 GHz Dual Core ARM
  • Storage: 8 GB
  • RAM: 1 GB DDR3
  • Camera:
  • Display Size: 10.3 inches
  • Resolution: 1872×1404 (~226 ppi)
  • Refresh Rate: Not applicable
  • Weight: 0.89 lbs
  • Port: Micro USB
  • Battery: 1-2 weeks
  • Stylus Included?: Yes

If you just want to take notes, the ReMarkable 2 is the best choice here, period. It features a low-latency E ink display that has a simplistic UI primarily meant for annotating PDFs and taking notes. And boy, does it accomplish that very well.

 Built off Wacom’s EMR technology, you can use some other styluses such as the Samsung S21 Ultra’s S Pen, just fine. However, stuff that uses Bluetooth, like the Apple Pencil, will not work. I absolutely love ReMarkable’s very basic UI. You can transfer files from the tablet to your mobile / PC, and that’s pretty much all you need.

 What I don’t like is some features being locked in a paywall. For instance, ReMarkable just ends up deleting notes stored in the cloud after 90 days if you don’t shell out an additional $4.99 per month. And, $7.99 per month lets you transfer files from their cloud servers to DropBox or Google Drive while also unlocking OCR.

 But, when it comes to pure note-taking experience, this E Ink tablet is the best we’ve seen so far and can even be compared to heavy hitters like the iPad Pro. With the battery lasting about a week, it’s quite clear that the ReMarkable 2 isn’t meant for YouTube, but it serves one purpose. And that’s taking notes.

 

Pros
  • Best in class battery life
  • E Ink display feels very natural
Cons
  • Niche use case, doesn’t operate like a typical tablet
  • Has a Micro USB charging port 

Why We Ranked iPad Pro Above The iPad Air

The iPad Air is an excellent tablet for taking notes. However, the iPad Pro is slightly better due to a few reasons. Firstly, it offers a larger 12.9 inch option for those interested in more screen real estate. Secondly, the iPad Pro has a 120 Hz ProMotion display while the iPad Air runs a 60 Hz display.

When it comes to note-taking, fluidity really does make an immediate difference. The iPad Pro just feels more natural and responsive to type on compared to the iPad Air. While the CPU on the iPad Pro is better, I’d argue that it won’t really make a difference, especially if your primary use case is note-taking.

Besides that, the iPad Pro has better speakers, a better camera array, and a more industrial, rugged design. But, it is the larger screen coupled with, the better refresh rate that really makes a difference for the avid note taker, which is why we ranked the iPad Pro above the iPad Air when it comes to taking notes.

Which Apps Can Convert Handwritng to Text?

There’s a plethora of applications that aim to convert handwriting to text. However, there are only a select few that we’ve seen that actually live up to their claims and are great note-taking applications in a general sense.

We’re going to be listing down one for each platform (iOS and Android)

GoodNotes 5

Compatibility: iOS / iPadOS

GoodNotes 5 remains my go-to favorite for note-taking. With an emphasis on providing professional tools such as a laser pointer and presentation mode, you also get a suite of quality-of-life features such as the ability to convert your handwriting to text.

I’ve tried the feature myself, and it works great on my iPad Pro. While some handwriting is, of course, harder to understand for the application than others, it still does a great job at converting your notes.

Notability

Compatibility: iOS / iPadOS

You will need a premium subscription in order to turn your handwritten notes into text, which will cost you an additional $9.99 per year. There are some other features that will be unlocked like math conversion, yearly planner, stickers, themes, journals, etc.

Evernote

Compatibility: Android / iOS / macOS / ChromeOS / Windows / WebApp

Evernote is the de-facto standard for any note-taking platform and for good reason. The application effortlessly synchronizes your notes across the cloud and provides a useful suite of features that help you take notes, whether in text or handwritten.

While the OCR feature is great, I find it to be a bit hit or miss depending on your handwriting. This is probably because you won’t be using the app itself for handwriting and instead use the camera as a scanner. While flexibility is welcome, it does lead to some swayed results sometimes.

FAQ

Is Apple Pencil Worth It Just For Note Taking?

Yes, the Apple Pencil is worth it just for note-taking. This is because it is the only stylus that you can use with your iPad. So, if you want to take notes on your iPad, you will need to use the Apple Pencil as no other stylus works with it. Doubling down, it also is a great tool for artists and professionals alike.

Is The iPad Air or Mini Better For Note Taking?

The iPad Air is better than the iPad Mini for note taking. This is because of two reasons. Firstly, iPad Air has a larger screen (10.9 inches vs iPad Mini 8.3 inches) which allows for more note-taking real estate. Secondly, it has a more powerful CPU (the M1) which lets you use more complex applications such as Autodesk Sketchbook with ease.

Is It Better To Take Notes On An iPad Or Notebook?

It is better to take notes on an iPad. This is because you’ll be able to digitally save and keep all your notes piled up in one place forever. You’ll also be able to export and share them quickly and can also print them out if needed. Moreover, it’s healthier for the environment to use a tablet over an elongated series of times rather than investing in swathes of paper.

Is Amazon Fire Good For Note Taking?

No, the Amazon Fire is not a good tablet for note-taking. While it does have decent stylus support, it is prone to lagging due to its poor CPU. Moreover, it doesn’t support the Google Play Store, which means you’ll need to sideload applications or stick with whatever Amazon ends up offering you. 

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I love tech and all about it. I'm interested in finding ways how they can make my life more productive, and I share my knowledge with my blog readers. I'm an iPad Pro, iPhone, MacBook, and Apple Watch user, so I know a thing or two about these devices and try to write helpful content around these topics.